Seam in Action Open18 to Java EE 6 Migration

This tutorial will walk through converting the Open18 application from Dan Allen’s Seam in Action from Seam 2 to Java EE 6. It will be as plain Java EE 6 as possible. The application will also be upgraded to RichFaces 4.1 (the current release at time of writing).

Migrate to Maven

Seam 2, prior to 2.3, used Apache Ant as its build tool of choice. In migrating to vanilla Java EE 6 or when using CDI extensions written by others, Apache Maven (or similar such as Gradle, Builder, Ant+Ivy, SBT, etc) will be the preferred build tool.

Setup Maven Structure

Apache Maven follows a standard project layout defined below

Standard Maven Layout
  ├── pom.xml
  └── src
      ├── main
      │   ├── java
      │   ├── resources
      │   │   └── META-INF
      │   └── webapp
      │       └── WEB-INF
      └── test
          ├── java
          └── resources

A full explanation of Apache Maven is beyond this tutorial. More information about Apache Maven (probably more than you’d ever want to know) is available from Sonatype at Maven: The Complete Reference.

The pom.xml file defines all of the dependencies of the project and instructions for building the project. The directory structure is fairly self explanatory. Application source lives under src/main/java. All of the tests are under src/test/java. Additional resources for the application such as persistence.xml will be at src/main/resources/META-INF, and lastly, JSF views and other web assets such as images, css, javascript, etc. will be under src/main/webapp.

Flesh out pom.xml

Below is the contents for the pom.xml file. There’s very little there in terms of dependencies because the bulk of the dependencies will be provided for the project by the application server. It is important to note that any dependency that must be present for either compilation or runtime but is already within the application server be stated in the pom and given the "provided" scope. Further information about the sections of the pom.xml file are given as comments in the actual file

pom.xml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"
         xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

    <groupId>org.open18</groupId>
    <artifactId>open18</artifactId>
    <packaging>war</packaging>
    <version>2.0.0.Beta-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <name>Open18 application from Seam in Action</name>

    <!-- It is easier to set versions here thar will / could be used in multiple locations. -->
    <properties>
        <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
        <jboss.javaee6.version>2.1.0.Beta1</jboss.javaee6.version>
        <richfaces.version>4.2.1.Final</richfaces.version>
    </properties>

    <!--
      This section pulls in other poms with all the versions set. The bom artifacts
      use versions of modules that are known to work well together, easing the burden
      of finding all these on your own
    -->
    <dependencyManagement>
        <dependencies>
            <dependency>
                <groupId>org.jboss.spec</groupId>
                <artifactId>jboss-javaee6-specs-bom</artifactId>
                <version>${jboss.javaee6.version}</version>
                <type>pom</type>
                <scope>import</scope>
            </dependency>
            <dependency>
                <groupId>org.richfaces</groupId>
                <artifactId>richfaces-bom</artifactId>
                <version>${richfaces.version}</version>
                <type>pom</type>
                <scope>import</scope>
            </dependency>
        </dependencies>
    </dependencyManagement>

    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.enterprise</groupId>
            <artifactId>cdi-api</artifactId>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.jboss.spec.javax.faces</groupId>
            <artifactId>jboss-jsf-api_2.1_spec</artifactId>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.jboss.spec.javax.el</groupId>
            <artifactId>jboss-el-api_2.2_spec</artifactId>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.validation</groupId>
            <artifactId>validation-api</artifactId>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.hibernate.javax.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>hibernate-jpa-2.0-api</artifactId>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.jboss.spec.javax.ejb</groupId>
            <artifactId>jboss-ejb-api_3.1_spec</artifactId>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.richfaces.ui</groupId>
            <artifactId>richfaces-components-api</artifactId>
            <scope>compile</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.richfaces.ui</groupId>
            <artifactId>richfaces-components-ui</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.richfaces.core</groupId>
            <artifactId>richfaces-core-impl</artifactId>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>

    <!-- Tells Maven this project is to use Java 6, also creates the static meta model for the entities -->
    <build>
        <finalName>${project.artifactId}</finalName>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3.2</version>
                <configuration>
                    <source>1.6</source>
                    <target>1.6</target>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.zeroturnaround</groupId>
                <artifactId>jrebel-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>1.1.1</version>
                <executions>
                    <execution>
                        <id>generate-rebel-xml</id>
                        <phase>process-resources</phase>
                        <goals>
                            <goal>generate</goal>
                        </goals>
                    </execution>
                </executions>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
</project>

Migrate to JPA 2.0

JSR 317, the update to the Java Persistence API includes a number of updates, many of which users had been asking for including improved mappings, a criteria API, ordering of collections, eviction control, access to a second level cache, and locking improvements. Setup and configuration is the same as the initial JPA specification, as is usage.

Additional information can be found at the migration guide to AS7.

There have been issues in the past with Seam 2 when using a Seam Managed Persistence Context and having entities become detached or issues with transactions. This migration recommends using a transaction scoped Persistence Context and using EJBs as backing beans. This allows declarative transaction control and a familiar Persistence Context injection strategy. Due to this change, use of the EntityManager.merge() function is required when using entities which may have become detached from a previous transaction (or request). Also recommended is the use of the @Version annotation and column in the entities to allow for optimistic locking.

Update persistence.xml to 2.0

JPA 2 is backwards compatible with JPA 1. All entities should work correctly as they did using a JPA 1 implementation. The version in persistence.xml should be updated to take advantage of new features though. Such features include the type safe criteria api, new mappings, and additional methods.

src/main/resources/META-INF/persistence.xml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!-- Persistence deployment descriptor for dev profile -->
<persistence xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence"
             xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
             xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence/persistence_2_0.xsd"
             version="2.0">

   <persistence-unit name="open18" transaction-type="JTA">
      <provider>org.hibernate.ejb.HibernatePersistence</provider>
      <jta-data-source>jboss/datasources/open18Datasource</jta-data-source>
      <properties>
         <property name="hibernate.dialect" value="org.hibernate.dialect.H2Dialect"/>
      </properties>
   </persistence-unit>
</persistence>

Metamodel Generation

To take full advantage of type saftey, static meta model classes should be created or generated. The simplest way of doing this is using an annotation processor such as Hibernate’s JPA 2 Metamodel Generator. Additional information on using this annotation processor can be found in the documentation. For this migration, the annotation processor was used once and then removed from the pom.xml file.

Migrate to Bean Validation from Hibernate Validator 3

Java EE 6 contains another specification which standardized validation: JSR 303 - Bean Validation. Hibernate Validator 4 (4.2.0 is shipped with AS7) is the reference implementation. This is a completely different code base and includes all new package, validations and ways of interacting with those validations. If the application is only using the annotations, these are typically a package change and at times an annotation change. For Course, the @org.hibernate.validator.Length validation becomes the @javax.validation.constraints.Size annotation. In some cases, such as the GolferValidator in Open18, this can become a custom constraint. Information about custom constraints can be found at the Hibernate Validator documentation.

For more information about migrating from Hibernate Validator 3, please see the migration documentation.

Below is an excerpt from the Course entity demonstrating some JSR 303 validations

src/main/java/org/open18/model/Course.java
@Column(name = "GREENS", nullable = false, length = 15)
@NotNull
@Size(max = 15)
public String getGreens() {
    return this.greens;
}

public void setGreens(String greens) {
    this.greens = greens;
}

@Column(name = "YEAR_BUILT")
@Min(1000)
@Max(9999)
public Integer getYearBuilt() {
    return this.yearBuilt;
}

public void setYearBuilt(Integer yearBuilt) {
    this.yearBuilt = yearBuilt;
}

@Column(name = "NUM_HOLES", nullable = false)
@NotNull
@Min(9)
@Max(18)
public int getNumHoles() {
    return this.numHoles;
}

@NotNull, @Size, @Min, and @Max are all standard validations from the javax.validation.constraints package. There are other constraints provided by Hibernate Validator, however, to maintain portability only standard constraints were used. Other examples can be found in the entities.

Migrate to CDI

Java EE 6 had a few new additions to the platform, two of them combining to formally standardize dependency injection for the Enterprise Edition of Java. These two JSRs are JSR 330 which defines the annotations used for injection, and JSR 299 which defines how dependency resolution and injection works, scopes for the platform similar to what Seam 2 provided, and possibly the most important of all: extensibility for the platform. These two specifications were developed with input from authors of other dependency injection solutions in Java such as Spring, Guice, and Seam

With these specifications at least two features of Seam 2 had become part of the platform. Also many of the features Seam 2 had for working JSF also became part of the JSF specification. Migration from Seam 2 to Java EE 6 makes sense, and isn’t terribly difficult (of course this depends on some of the features that were used from Seam 2).

Activation

Seam 2 required the use of the seam.properties file to mark a jar, or WEB- INF/classes as containing Seam 2 components. This was mainly an optimization for scanning purposes. CDI has a similar requirement. Each Bean Archive (jar, war, etc. containing CDI beans) must contain a META-INF/beans.xml for a jar and WEB-INF/beans.xml for a war. Some configuration may occur in this file, but often times it can be left blank. In this migration of Open18 the following beans.xml is used

src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/beans.xml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xsi:schemaLocation="
              http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee
              http://docs.jboss.org/cdi/beans_1_0.xsd">
</beans>

Substitute Seam 2 annotations for CDI equivalents

Nearly all of the annotations that were Seam 2 based have equivalents in Java EE 6, however, some of them do not or are no longer needed.

Injecting resources

Because Seam components were typically not managed by the container (unless an EJB happened to be a Seam component, such as a SFSB or SLSB) all injection has handled used Seam’s @In. As mentioned earlier, Java EE 6 has standardized Dependency Injection using JSR 330. The annotation now is @javax.inject.Inject. All of the @In annotations will need to be replaced.

There is also a difference in defining what is a bean (or a component in Seam 2). In Seam 2 all components needed to be annotated with the @Name annotation. This is no longer the case. Each class (there are some exceptions, please refer to JSR 299 or a CDI implementation documentation) with a no-args constructor is now a managed bean (not to be confused with the JSF Managed Bean). There is, however the @javax.inject.Named annotation. Its main purpose is to register an EL name for the bean. If the bean is not going to be used in an EL expression, it is not needed.

The CourseComparison class has been modified below to make use of @Inject, @ConversationScoped, @Named and also @Produces. More detail about these annotations can be found below, the JSR 299 specification, or a CDI implementation’s documentation

src/main/java/org/open18/action/CourseComparison.java
package org.open18.action;

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Set;

import javax.enterprise.context.Conversation;
import javax.enterprise.context.ConversationScoped;
import javax.enterprise.inject.Produces;
import javax.inject.Inject;
import javax.inject.Named;

import org.open18.model.Course;
import org.open18.model.dao.CourseDao;

@Named
@ConversationScoped
public class CourseComparison implements Serializable {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = -4881060214215467731L;

    @Inject
    private CourseDao courseDao;

    @Inject
    private transient Conversation conversation;

  private boolean ready = false;

  protected Set<Course> courses = new HashSet<Course>();

  public void mark(Long courseId) {
    Course course = courseDao.findBy(courseId);
    if (course == null) {
      return;
    }
    courses.add(course);
    ready = courses.size() >= 2;

        if (conversation.isTransient()) {
            conversation.begin();
        }
  }

  @Produces
  @Named("comparedCourses")
  @ConversationScoped
  public List<Course> getCourses() {
      return new ArrayList<Course>(courses);
  }

  public boolean isMarked(Course course) {
    return courses.contains(course);
  }

  public void reset() {
    courses.clear();
    ready = false;
  }

  public String validate() {
    return ready ? "valid" : "invalid";
  }

  public boolean isReady() {
      return ready;
  }

  public void setReady(boolean ready) {
      this.ready = ready;
  }
}

Producing resources

Seam 2 had a feature called factories which allowed a resource to be created and outjected. It allowed for a more custom creation than what Seam could do by calling the no-args constructor. CDI a similar feature called producers. There are two big differences between factories and producers and the way both platforms handle proxies.

  • Producers are called once for the scope, similar to scoping a factory, however, they cannot be changed and "re-produced" similar to some approaches that have been done with Seam 2.

  • Factories do not support injection. With a producer, each parameter is an injected resource.

Because of the first difference, at times can be necessary to to create a wrapper around the actual object desired and modify the information as needed. For the comparedCourses above, the list of new checked courses could be produced and scoped as a @SessionScoped resource, but it would never change for that session. If the list were wrapped within another object (or reproduced when needed, in this case when a new conversation references this list), the internal list could be modified without having to reproduce the container object.

In Open18, besides the comparedCourses mentioned, another resource which must be produced which Seam 2 had readily available out of the box is the collection of messages. This is really a simple ResourceBundle, but it isn’t available out of the box. This allows for a combination of messages similar to what Seam 2 offered, though done in Java code instead of components.xml.

src/main/java/org/open18/ui/UiProducers.java
package org.open18.ui;

import java.util.Locale;
import java.util.ResourceBundle;

import javax.enterprise.inject.Produces;
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
import javax.inject.Named;

public class UiProducers {
    @Produces @Named("messages")
    public ResourceBundle getBundle() {
        final Locale requestLocale = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getRequestLocale();
        return ResourceBundle.getBundle("messages", requestLocale);
    }
}

Scopes

Scopes are nothing new when coming from Seam 2. The standard scopes still exist when using CDI:

  • @ApplicationScoped

  • @SessionScoped

  • @ConversationScoped

  • @RequestScoped

There is no business process scope or method scope however, and @RequestScoped is essentially the same as EVENT from Seam 2. CDI has one other scope which does not exist in Seam 2: @Dependent. This scope is similar in life as a typical Java object creation. It will last as long as the containing object survives. There’s also one important difference, when injected, the inject object is the actual object not a proxy like the other scopes. This scope is also the default scope if no scope is specified for the bean.

If the need arises for additional scopes, such as a business process scope, CDI allows for additional scopes to be created. Please refer to the JSR 299 spec or CDI implementation documentation for defining scopes.

Migrate Query / Home objects

The application framework within Seam 2 consisting of Home and Query objects has proved to be very powerful for CRUD based sites. When coupled with seam-gen, it rivals that of other frameworks such as Grails, Ruby on Rails and the like. There were some glaring holes with it though. Using inheritance instead of composition, lack of being able to search for null fields, inability to perform joins, etc. Java EE 6 doesn’t have anything ready to use to fill this gap. Fortunately a little creativity and the JPA Criteria API can go a long way.

In this migration a base dao abstract class has been created to keep things DRY. A similar approach could be done with composition, however, some of the type safety would be lost. This base class contains all of the functionality for the DAO, including a dynamic search similar to the Seam 2 Query search idea. The BaseDao class can be found at src/main/java/org/open18/model/dao/BaseDao.

INFO: The BaseDao in this migration has a few shortcuts and will not work in all cases, however, for this migration it served well enough. The BaseDao class makes use of the Criteria API from JPA 2.0, which is beyond the scope of this guide. Please consult the specification for the best information about the Criteria API and how to use it. More examples of these DAOs can be found in the src/main/java/org/open18/model/dao package. Of particular note is the RoundDao which has an override using a criteria object instead of an example.

To fill the Home object from Seam 2, simple backing beans which manage an instance of the entity work nicely, and little code is needed to create a full replacement when using the DAO to perform all the needed functions. For this migration each entity has a simple (no code in the child class unless needed for queries) DAO created, and also a backing bean for each entity to act as the buffer between the view and the backend. These backing beans also happen to be Stateful Session beans in this instance. It’s not required, but the advantages of SFSBs have been enumerated many times throughout the years. These backing beans are annotated with one of the scope annotations mentioned earlier and also with @Named so they can be used in EL.

Warning
It is best not to directly use JPA entities created by CDI, unless they are created by a producer. If CDI manages the life cycle of an entity, JPA functionality is lost and the entire object will have to be cloned into a new object to be persisted.

The TeeSetAction class is an example of using composition to recreate something similar to the Home class from Seam 2.

src/main/java/org/open18/action/TeeSetAction.java
package org.open18.action;

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;

import javax.ejb.Stateful;
import javax.ejb.TransactionAttribute;
import javax.ejb.TransactionAttributeType;
import javax.enterprise.context.Conversation;
import javax.enterprise.context.ConversationScoped;
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
import javax.inject.Inject;
import javax.inject.Named;

import org.open18.model.Course;
import org.open18.model.Tee;
import org.open18.model.TeeSet;
import org.open18.model.dao.TeeSetDao;

@ConversationScoped
@Named
@Stateful
public class TeeSetAction implements Serializable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 2281839629956903065L;

    @Inject
    private TeeSetDao dao;

    @Inject
    private transient Conversation conversation;

    private Long teeSetId;

    private TeeSet teeSet;

    private boolean managed;

    @Inject
    private void init() {
        teeSet = new TeeSet();
    }

    public void loadTeeSet() {
        if (this.teeSetId != null && !FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().isPostback()) {
            this.teeSet = this.dao.findBy(teeSetId);
            this.managed = true;
        }
        beginConversation();
    }

    public void beginConversation() {
        if (conversation.isTransient()) {
            conversation.begin();
        }
    }

    public void endConversation() {
        if (!conversation.isTransient()) {
            conversation.end();
        }
    }

    @TransactionAttribute(TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
    public String save() {
        dao.saveAndFlush(teeSet);
        endConversation();
        return "/TeeSetList.xhtml";
    }

    @TransactionAttribute(TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
    public String update() {
        dao.saveAndFlush(teeSet);
        return "/TeeSet.xhtml?teeSetId=" + teeSet.getId();
    }

    @TransactionAttribute(TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
    public String remove() {
        dao.remove(teeSet);
        endConversation();
        return "/TeeSetList.xhtml";
    }

    public Long getTeeSetId() {
        return this.teeSetId;
    }

    public void setTeeSetId(Long newTeeSetId) {
        if (newTeeSetId != null) {
            this.teeSetId = newTeeSetId;
        }
    }

    public TeeSet getTeeSet() {
        return teeSet;
    }

    public void setTeeSet(TeeSet newTee) {
        teeSet = newTee;
    }

    public boolean isManaged() {
        return managed;
    }

    public void setManaged(boolean newManaged) {
        managed = newManaged;
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public List<Tee> getTees() {
        return teeSet.getTees() == null ? Collections.EMPTY_LIST : new ArrayList<Tee>(teeSet.getTees());
    }

    public void selectCourse(Course course) {
        this.teeSet.setCourse(course);
    }
}

All of the Action classes in the migration are EJBs. This brings declarative transaction support among others. The init() method is annotated with @Inject which works similarly to @Create from Seam 2, but allows for injection of parameters.

Changes in the conversation model

CDI has a conversation state similar to Seam 2, however, there are some major differences. The largest being that only one conversation can be active at a time per session. This means no nested conversations or multiple conversations via different browser tabs and also no workspace manager. The conversation, until CDI 1.1, is also tied directly to JSF and cannot be used outside of JSF and still remain portable. There is also no annotation control over the conversation. Instead the conversation must be injected and then managed (started, ended, timeout configured, etc.) as was done above in TeeSetAction.

The conversation can still be tracked by using a query parameter for JSF GET requests, the name is cid and the value is javax.enterprise.context.conversation.id. However, using a conversation outside of JSF will require additional work, and non portable changes to an application, unless a new scope is created for the application which behaves like the conversation from Seam 2.

Migrate to JSF 2.0

Seam 2 contained many enhancements to JSF 1.2. Many of these enhancements made it into the official JSF 2 (JSR 314) specification! Some of these enhancements include h:link and h:button, f:metadata and f:viewparam. Also included in JSF 2 is facelets as the preferred view description language. All of the power of facelets which was use in Seam 2 applications is now available standard. Composite Components also made their debut in JSR 314 as an easier way to create JSF components and reusable templates.

Because there are many JSF related enhancements in Seam 2, there are a number of actions needed to happen to migrate successfully to JSF 2.

Update faces-config.xml to 2.0

Similar to Seam 2, the faces-config.xml file is very sparse, and essentially becomes a marker file to include JSF support. Below is a typical JSF 2 faces- config.xml file.

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<faces-config version="2.0" xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee"
              xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
              xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-facesconfig_2_0.xsd">

</faces-config>

In the Open18 application, there were multiple languages supported. That part will need to remain.

src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/faces-config.xml excerpt
  ...
  <application>
      <locale-config>
          <default-locale>en</default-locale>
          <supported-locale>bg</supported-locale>
          <supported-locale>de</supported-locale>
          <supported-locale>en</supported-locale>
          <supported-locale>fr</supported-locale>
          <supported-locale>tr</supported-locale>
      </locale-config>
  </application>
  ...

The main changes, as listed above in the faces-config.xml are an update for the schema, the version and the removal of the view handler declaration.

Migrate to RichFaces 4.2

Migrating to JSF 2 also involves an update to the component library. Open18 made use of RichFaces. True JSF 2 support in RichFaces came out with version 4.0.0.Final. Currently RichFaces 4.1.0.Final is out and 4.2.0.CR1 is also available. For many components the switch is change of JAR files, however, some components have not yet been migrated, or others have been combined. Information about component migration can be found on the RichFaces wiki.

Rework Navigation from pages.xml

Two changes in JSF 2 which Seam influenced are in navigation. Navigation enhancements include implicit navigation and also conditional navigation, similar to conditions in pages.xml from Seam 2. These two features have been covered in many places. While slightly more work in some cases, using a combination of these two features navigation from pages.xml should be fairly straight forward.

While not directly related to navigation, page actions and params also have corresponding solutions in JSF 2. Any number of view parameters can be assigned to a view. They also can participate in conversion and validation, which is more powerful than what Seam 2 offered in pages.xml. A view action in JSF 2 can be done by creating a listener for the preRenderView event within an f:metadata section.

Seam Tags and equivalents in JSF and RichFaces

Seam 2 introduced some useful JSF components, some which made navigation easier, others which are useful for conversation. The navigation components are simple to migration, while some of the others are a little more difficult and a small collection do not have any replacement.

The first step for migrating these tags is to remove the seam namespace from the view. Below is a table of the tags in Seam 2 and replacements either in JSF 2 or RichFaces.

Seam 2 Tag JSF 2 or RichFaces

s:div

No direct mapping. Could be done with an h:panelGroup layout="block or a ui:fragment containing a div.

s:fragment

ui:fragment

s:link

h:link action maps to outcome, and there is no propagation attribute.

s:button

h:button same conditions as h:link

s:decorate

There is no direct mapping for this, however the same functionality can be achieved with the UIInputContainer and a composite container, both of which are in the Open18 migration (src/main/java/org/open18/ui/component/UIInputContainer.java and src/main/webapp/resources/components/input.xhtml respectively).

s:label

No direct mapping, but h:outputLabel is similar.

s:span

No direct mapping, but similar output can be achieved by h:panelGroup or a ui:fragment with a span element

s:message

No direct mapping for the same functionality, though rich:message could be used instead.

s:validateAll

f:validateBean or rich:validator can achieve similar affects.

s:convertDateTime

A similar affect can be achieved by using the standard f:convertDateTime and setting the locale, or setting the context-param javax.faces.DATETIMECONVERTER_DEFAULT_TIMEZONE_IS_SYSTEM_TIMEZONE to true, as defined in the spec in section 11.1.3. Dan Allen blogged about this before the spec was final, however, nothing was changed.

s:convertEnum

No direct mapping. A custom converter is recommended using the standard JSF enum converter as a base.

s:enumItem

No direct mapping

s:selectItems

h:selectItems

s:defaultAction

No direct mapping

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Recent Changelog

  • Jul 18, 2012: Minor corrections Jason Porter
  • May 23, 2012: Removing reference to shiro and cdi query Jason Porter
  • May 04, 2012: Add release script, and add pdf/epub to generate Pete Muir

See full history »